Posters

Poster; From Euston to Clapham Common the transformation is complete, by Richard T Cooper, 1924
Simple name : Poster
Date : 1924
Collection : Posters
Object location : Covent Garden
Reference number : 1983/4/1770
Size : H 1000mm, W 1263mm
Print code : 1423,1000.4.9.24
Reproduced in : Taylor, Sheila (ed), 2001. The Moving Metropolis. Laurence King Publishing in association with London's Transport Museum, Title Page
Publisher : Underground Electric Railway Company Ltd : 1924
Printer : Johnson, Riddle & Company Ltd
Mode : Tube
Descriptive size : Quad royal
Content text : UNDERGROUND The City And South London Railway re-opened 1924 at an extra cost of #3,000,000 The City And South London Railway opened 1890. Its total cost was #3,000,0000. From Euston to Clapham Common The Transformation Is Complete Ref
Additional information : The Underground commissioned this poster in 1924. It was designed by Richard T Cooper to promote the changing face of the network at the time. To the right, a ghostly Edwardian family prepare to board an early Tube train. To the left, the new standard stock has its air-powered doors open to welcome contemporary passengers. These new trains were introduced in 1923 to serve the recently modernised City & South London Railway. This poster specifically advertises that Euston and Clapham Common stations have just reopened after reconstruction work.
Title : From Euston to Clapham Common the transformation is complete
Colour : Yellow,Brown
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Record completeness :
Record 90% complete

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By 1914 the Underground Group ran most of the Tube lines, three tram systems and the main London bus company, the LGOC. The posters publicise all these transport modes. Outside the Underground Group were the Metropolitan Railway and London County Council (LCC) Tramways, which ran separate poster campaigns. All these companies were merged into London Transport (LT) in 1933. The four main line railway companies also used posters to promote their London suburban services. Transport for London (TfL) replaced LT in 2000 with wider responsibility including taxis, streets, river services and some overground rail.
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The Underground has a long tradition of high quality station architecture, and has consciously promoted its best new environmental design through posters since the 1920s. More than 50 pre-war stations, including many designed by Charles Holden, are now listed buildings. New developments, station modernisation and openings, artistic decorative schemes and special exhibitions at stations such as Charing Cross (Embankment), which had its own display gallery until the 1960s, have all been featured in posters
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By 1914 the Underground Group ran most of the Tube lines, three tram systems and the main London bus company, the LGOC. The posters publicise all these transport modes. Outside the Underground Group were the Metropolitan Railway and London County Council (LCC) Tramways, which ran separate poster campaigns. All these companies were merged into London Transport (LT) in 1933. The four main line railway companies also used posters to promote their London suburban services. Transport for London (TfL) replaced LT in 2000 with wider responsibility including taxis, streets, river services and some overground rail.
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Giving passengers useful information to help them on their journey has always been a major purpose of posters. The least successful are those that are difficult to read because they rely on too much text or have a confusing layout. To convey an important message quickly a poster should be concise and use a strong visual image but few words. Most London Transport posters are models of clarity but in the 1950s in particular the copywriter seemed to take precedence over the artist and the results often look as cluttered and wordy as Victorian posters with no illustrations had once done.
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Quad royal : Quad royal is the descriptive size for posters that are 40 x 50 inches. It is the standard size used by the Underground for maps and is most commonly used in posters for designs requiring fine detail, such as decorative maps.
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A ghostly Edwardian family are board an early Tube train on the right, while a new train has its air-powered doors open to welcome contemporary passengers on this poster designed to promote network changes...

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